22 ways to increase your energy

22 Ways to Increase Your Energy

Fatigue and low energy levels tend to be significant issues when fighting chronic illnesses like Fibromyalgia, chronic pain and myofascial pain syndrome. In addition, pretty much all mamas that I speak to could do with an energy infusion too, so today I am offering you a list of ways to increase your energy.

22 ways to increase your energy

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  • Meditation – I am a big fan of meditation, as anyone following my blog for any amount of time would know. I can’t nap so it’s been a lifesaver on the days I am too miserably exhausted to keep going.
  • Healthy eating – food is fuel, fuel it right and it will work better. Personally, cutting white carbohydrates made a huge difference. For some it’s completely cutting grains, others it’s the entire Paleo diet, it’s all worth a try.
  • Getting the best night’s sleep possible – yes, this is a minefield when you have a chronic illness for which insomnia is an issue or when you have tiny children partying through the night. Low Dose Naltrexone is the only way I have managed to sleep in more than one hour blocks. For others it increases insomnia. If only insomnia wasn’t so contrary.
22 ways to increase your energy snip

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  • Supplements for energy:
  • D-Ribose – this didn’t work for me, but my worst issue was definitely lack of sleep so I may notice a difference when I try it again after baby comes. I have heard heaps of people who swear by it.
  • CoQ10 – again, this didn’t previously work for me, but now that my sleep is under better control, I am keen to try it again when baby vacates the building! I have also heard of a high number of people for whom it works. It’s best taken in it’s more activated form ubiquinol.
  • Ashwagandha – I find taking this a bit like having too many coffees, I can’t seem to tolerate it, but it was worth a try.
  • Acetyl-L Carnitine – this one upset my tummy so I couldn’t take it near long enough to ascertain if it would help with my energy levels (two doses and I knew). This is another some that some people seem to swear by.
  • Essential oils – I adore essential oils, especially as they are completely natural. As I was just starting my journey when I became pregnant, I haven’t tried as many as I’d like. Though lavender and roman chamomile are brilliant to massage into tired, sore legs, glutes and low backs!
  • Ginger – it is warming, soothing and comforting. As a bonus it also soothes an upset tummy.
  • Lemon – it is meant to be uplifting and inspiring a positive mood.

More posts you may like

Why I’m Treating the Fibromyalgia as Naturally as Possible
Natural Pain Relief: Supplements for Fibromyalgia Pain
Five Ways I Cope With Fibromyalgia: AKA Lifestyle Choices to Live Well

  • Cedarwood – apparently this essential oil stimulates the production of melatonin, which helps you sleep better, which in turn gives you more energy.
  • Grapefruit – is meant to uplift, revive and inspire.
  • Peppermint – this one is uplifting and brightening (I find) and I also find it highly useful for nausea.
  • Yoga poses like:
  • Downward Facing Dog
  • Cat and cow pose
  • Half sun salutation sequence
  • A quick, brisk walk outside
  • Vitamin D – get outside into the first morning sunshine or consider a vitamin D supplement.
  • Stay within your energy envelope – yes, this involves finding your energy envelope and it isn’t easy. I wrote about this in my book, that I was trying to fight my body as if I was at a level able to work six hours per day (and then go home to small children) when my pain and fatigue levels were more in line with four or five. This website takes you through the idea of your energy envelope. It’s pretty in depth and not a quick fix. But adhering to what I know I am capable of makes a big difference in pain and fatigue levels.
  • Diaphragmatic breathing (breathing from your tummy NOT your chest)

I hope that at least one of these 22 things are helpful for you. I’d love (LOVE) to hear of any other things you have come across to help you with fatigue/energy boosting?


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Natural Pain Relief: Supplements for Fibromyalgia Energy

With the world’s eye on those of us suffering from chronic pain, I feel like bad news is delivered daily into my inbox with newsletters or articles telling me I can’t access something that helps me manage. Opoids came under fire, now NSAIDS are ready for scrutiny. We know the medicines we need aren’t ideal but neither is chronic sleep deprivation or untreated pain. Seriously, there’s research!
To this end, I have decided to work through as many natural options as I can find to help you navigate potential new options for treatment.
The first post was for herbs you can infuse at home. The next was supplements for Fibromyalgia pain.
Natural Pain Relief Mechanisms supplements energy.png
This one is supplements for fibromyalgia energy. There is a seemingly endless list and I have done a lot of research on this area, but here I’ll present what I’ve tried with honest feedback.
There are some affiliate links here, I may make a small commission on any purchases at no extra cost to you.

CoQ10

In this article from Fibro Daze about improving mitochondrial function, coq10 is mentioned: “Researchers who studied the link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation in fibromyalgia concluded that CoQ10 has a potential therapeutic role in the condition. In one study, supplementation with 300 mg of coenzyme Q10 a day was found to be associated with clinical improvements, including a significant reduction in pain, fatigue, and morning tiredness.”
I tried this a few years ago and wasn’t impressed, however I would like to try this again now that I have a few more of my jigsaw puzzle pieces in place. I’ll update you.
For my free report Essential Oils for Natural Pain Relief sign up here.

D-ribose

This is a favourite of Dr Teitelbaum for energy, and a lot of people swear by it. Katarina from Skillfully Well sums up the case for D ribose well, “Mitochondria produce the energy, called ATP, used by your cells to carry out all their functions. D-ribose is essential to the production of ATP. Therefore, taking additional D-ribose should help to support mitochondrial function and improve energy output in fatigued patients.”
Personally, I derived no energy from it. Here’s my post about going on and off again to see if it would make a difference for me.
I suspect the mitochondrial support supplements don’t help me due to my fatigue potentially more effected by sleep (or the lack of). Though it isn’t the full picture.

Adrenal Support Herbs

It is not yet clear if adrenal fatigue causes Fibromyalgia, Fibromyalgia causes adrenal fatigue or they are completely separate. Though the body is a whole and I can see what effects so many systems (Fibromyalgia) could affect the adrenals, especially while the fight or flight response remains on overdrive.
I tried a generic adrenal support formula recently and didn’t feel any obvious effects from it. Ashwagandha (a common ingredient in these formulas) is meant to be supportive for those with energy troubles, “Ashwagandha, is an adaptogenic herb popular in Ayurvedic medicine that has shown incredible results for lowering cortisol and balancing thyroid hormones.”
Like a lot of things, it appears to be worth a try and I am glad to have ticked it off my list.

Acetyl L-Carnitine 

A study found, “Although this experience deserves further studies, these results indicate that LAC may be of benefit in patients with FMS, providing improvement in pain as well as the general and mental health of these patients.”
Unfortunately I found a tub and only managed four doses before I realised it was really upsetting my tummy.

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Graphic Printable Pain Relief with Templates

 To take the learning further I created a printable, based upon the chapter in my book Melissa vs Fibromyalgia and include templates for you to make your own plan: My Pain Relief Plan, My Medicine Plan and My Flare Relief Plan.

Some of my links are affiliate links, I may receive compensation at no extra cost to you if you purchase using these links. I never promote anything I don’t 100% support myself.

nursing with fibromyalgia

Nursing with Fibromyalgia: My Experience and Some Research

Like many areas of living with Fibromyalgia, I have found there to be little information on nursing with Fibromyalgia.

The Research

There are a few articles, like this one on Fibromyalgia Symptoms that mentions research but provides no links, “Numerous studies have been done evaluating how fibromyalgia influences breastfeeding. These studies all indicate that it is very hard to breastfeed with fibromyalgia.”Nursing with Fibromyalgia

The Fibromyalgia Health Center on WebMD posted an article in 2004 referencing a new study about nursing with Fibromyalgia.  This study was very small, with just nine mothers included:

“All nine women felt that they were not successful in their attempts to breastfeed, and felt frustrated,” Schaefer writes. Difficulties included muscle soreness, pain, and stiffness; fatigue; a perceived shortage of breast milk; and sore nipples.”

The article lists a few tips from the study which includes good nutrition, proper rest and paying attention to where and how you are nursing.

Early Pregnancy Symptoms and Fibromyalgia (2018 Edition)

Navigating Pain Relief in Pregnancy with Fibromyalgia

Necessary Baby Items for a Fibro Parent

The Survey

Please do remember that we are all unique, how we experience fibromyalgia and how we experience pregnancy or nursing. My story will not reflect yours. Before I give you my experiences, I’d like to show you some information from a survey I undertook when I was writing my book Pregnancy and Fibromyalgia.

Affiliate notice: Please note that some of my links are affiliate links, if you make a purchase using these links I may make a small commission at no extra cost to you, every little bit helps me create these resources. 

In response to the question, did you manage to nurse? 40% responded that they did for 12 months or more! 20% managed for both 12 month and 6 month periods (that’s 40% for 6-12 months!). 15% didn’t manage to nurse. 5% exclusively expressed. There were 20 respondents, so the sample size was small, but these are encouraging results.

table showing how long women with fibromyalgia nursed for

Survey results: How long respondents with Fibromyalgia nursed

Some advice from a respondent about nursing:

“The two hardest things for me have been lack of sleep, and being forced to sit in the same position for long periods of time while nursing, or while my son slept. I kept five different pillows on the couch, and used them to prop myself and him up at every angle. Really helped.”

My Experiences

Having had two children now, I thought I would share my experience. As with all areas of this illness, my experience may not be the same as another’s with Fibromyalgia, so my difficulties do not translate to all women with Fibromyalgia.

With both children I found nursing extremely painful, I had cracked and sore nipples from the second day cluster feeding with both babies. Both times, it took a long time for them to recover. Expressing was less painful, but still resulted in sore breasts.

The differences in situations were extreme.nursing with fibromyalgia

Baby One

With Nu, we found he was excessively windy and by week two we were going back and forward to doctors at the after hours centre. At last, at week three, we were sent to the hospital and there they found that he had pyloric stenosis – a thickened sphincter that wouldn’t let food out of the stomach to be digested, so it was forced back up and out of his mouth in projectile vomiting. After several days in hospital and a small operation, we came home and found that he doubled the amount he was taking at each feed. My supply couldn’t keep up, despite pumping three hourly the entire time he was in the hospital, my supply decreased in real numbers and relative numbers. I managed to keep him exclusively on breast milk until eight weeks. At this point whenever it was time to express, I would cry, so I knew it was time to finish up. I was just tired and sore and Nu was not a very settled baby and so cried the entire time I tried to express.

I was so relieved when parenting no longer needed to include my breasts. I am proud that I managed to give him such a good start in life, but I also wish I had given up sooner, but the pressure on mothers to breastfeed is enormous, even my expressing rather than feeding directly was seen as failure. My doctor and my Plunket Nurse were both supportive as they understood the Fibromyalgia and how hard I had tried.

Baby Two

With W I managed to persevere a little longer. My right breast got so sore and cracked from the second day cluster feeding that when I first tried to express, I expressed blood in the milk, it was a frightening sight! I persevered with the one side for another week before that became too sore (this guy is a rough feeder and liked to pull away with it clenched between his gums). I expressed four hourly during the day and once in the middle of the night (that was hard to leave baby sleeping after giving him a bottle and stay awake). My supply stayed static no matter what I did to try to increase it, so by week four, I was only just producing enough from both breasts for one feed. Luckily I had a lot of frozen milk from the first weeks of expressing.

This time I knew it didn’t have to be all or nothing (this is an important message for all mamas, you can mix feed!), I had more knowledge and therefore more power. I also ignored any messages of my being deficient or not trying hard enough. I managed to add in a physical feed each evening after he had spent the previous few hours having more regular bottles in his nightly cluster feed, this meant I didn’t have to worry about him not getting enough and he got some comfort from it at the end of a long day. It hurt, but swapping which breast I gave him each night helped me to cope. I worked with my midwife to reduce to a few feeds a day of my milk and add in formula for the shortfall. My plan was to give him whatever breast milk I could, for as long as I could.

As we know, plans do not always work out. Little W developed reflux and vomited my milk and got very sore. Through long weeks of trial and error we found that I could feed him directly (my measly 40 ml or so) followed immediately by a bottle of thickened formula, reducing the vomiting to spills and the gas pains greatly decreased. At seven weeks I was still managing to mix feed, with the miniscule supply I produced.

Due to the very different positions in my health and a lot more knowledge and confidence, I believe it was slightly easier the second time around. However, by 12 weeks my supply had completely dried up. I was really happy that I had been able to provide him with these vital nutrients for that long. I was also happy to not have to deal with expressing, feeding and bottles – it had begun to feel like my whole life revolved around his feeding. And at this time my life turned to revolving around his sleep, or lack of!

Pumping

One thing that helped me both times was my breast-pump. I used the Unimom Hospital Grade Double Expressing Machine (not currently available in US or UK Amazon) for these two. With my third, I have decided that I will not be able to express more than once or twice a day given that I have two other children four and under so I have the Avent Electric Pump (single, but you can get double) on my Amazon Baby Registry. FYI: Did you know that Amazon has a baby registry? You can sign up here Shop Amazon – Create an Amazon Baby Registry It’s basically a mobile registry (available anywhere!) and you will be eligible for discounts and rewards. If you’re going to purchase some of your items from Amazon, you may as well sign up (I did).

pumping or expressing for your babyFor a big guide on pumping for your baby see this post! 

I also only used Avent bottles because I liked the teat shape (it mimics the breast-shape) and found that helped my boys to avoid nipple confusion. We introduced bottles of expressed milk very early, so please don’t worry when people talk about waiting until breastfeeding is “fully established” – because of all the women I have heard of who have done this, they never got their baby to take a bottle. This may be alright for you, but for me, I needed that ability to leave someone else to do a feed.

My tips for nursing with Fibromyalgia are what most nursing women are told:

  • Try to rest as much as you can
  • Try to eat as well as you can
  • Drink lots of water
  • Make yourself as comfortable as possible when you feed
  • Know that whatever you manage to give your baby is awesome and that you cannot fail. You will be a great mama whether you feed physically, by expressed breast milk or by formula. A fed baby and a happy mama are both minimum requirements. (Your well being counts as much as baby’s and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise!)

I’d love to hear about your experiences with nursing with Fibromaylgia, if only so that others have something to read when they Google about it.


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definitive edition pregnancy and fibro

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Healthy Eating Tips

One of the things that I struggled with when the baby was small (and rarely sleeping), was to fuel myself right. It seemed that only unhealthy foods were suitable for one-handed eating.

Here are a few ideas to help get food into the cupboard or fridge when you have a moment:

Pressure cooker – I love my pressure cooker! I use it for beans, meat and grains.

I cook up a pot of quinoa (in around eight minutes) and leave it in the fridge for a few days, I eat it in place of rice as it’s a super load of good nutrients.

I also like to keep a container of beans or lentils in the fridge for quick go meals.

http://fastcooking.ca has a great guide for how long to cook each type of food and many recipes you can try.

Tasty tips: include tumeric, cumin, green herbs, a pinch of cayenne pepper, garlic and/or ginger and you’ll be boosting the goodness in your food!

Cook semolina or oat porridge ahead of time, up to three days in advance and keep it in the fridge. Add some nuts, seeds and fruit at serving to pump up the nutrients.

Keep the fruit bowl topped up.

Keep a container of nuts and raisins in the cupboard.

Make or buy yogurt and store in serving size containers.

For a while there (it’s moving into summer here now) I kept a bowl of soup in the fridge too. I cooked up any vegetables we had in the fridge and added chicken stock, tumeric, cumin, salt and cayenne pepper. This way I managed to get silver beet and other vegetables I tend to struggle to add I to the diet.

I hope some of these are useful, I have really been focusing on nutrition and the effect this has on my body at the moment, being well fuelled certainly makes the difference!